//VR Heatmap 2.0: Introducing Live Heatmaps, 3D Heatmaps, and Grid-based Heatmaps

VR Heatmap 2.0: Introducing Live Heatmaps, 3D Heatmaps, and Grid-based Heatmaps

On Wednesday, we launched VR Heatmap 2.0. See the video above for an explanation of the most important features, which include live heatmap access, 3D heatmap view, distinct grid-like heatmap view, and support for all VR platforms. 

For users new to VR, creating their first app using InstaVR is an accomplishment.

But for those serious about using VR to improve their employees, to sell products/services/experiences, to research… utilizing data from your VR users’ interaction with your applications is essential. Just as web marketers embraced analytics when it first went mainstream ~ 15 years ago, VR creators are starting to realize the value of user behavior data. And that’s why we’ve rolled out Heatmap 2.0 — our more robust, more comprehensive approach to visually showing you how your audience uses VR.

Below, we’ll cover the main features of Heatmap 2.0 and what the benefits of each are. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to our Customer Success team, available 24 hours a day on weekdays via Live Chat.

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1. Live VR Heatmaps

What is it?

Previously, when heatmap data was collected, it aggregated the data points collected over the course of an entire day. With Heatmap 2.0, you can watch in real-time the heatmap reflect a users’ interaction with a VR experience.

This is extremely valuable if you’re looking for feedback on how individual users view your VR app. Typically, you would only be able to see what your audience is looking at if you were in the same physical space as them — with the viewer a using Vive/Rift connected to a TV screen, or Gear VR/Daydream connected via Chromecast to a TV screen.

With live display in Heatmap 2.0, you could have a user on a different continent experiencing your VR app, and see exactly what they’re focusing on, in real time.

Who can benefit from it?

Marketing/Sales – There are many applicable uses here. Let’s say you were designing the layout of a store. You wanted to see if potential shoppers’ gazes would be drawn to the high margin products you’re trying to sell most. Try a few different layouts of the store, do 360 image captures, and then view in real-time as individual testers of your VR app browse the virtual representation of your store. If you identify certain patterns, you can readjust actual store layout to maximize profit.

Training – For new employees, being exposed virtually to their new job environment, you can learn what draws their attention. And teach them how to properly respond in real life. For instance, in a high stress situation like police officers face, what if you could view in Virtual Reality what is drawing their attention as they asses a virtual situation? You can then teach them, if they’re focusing on the wrong things, to overcome their instincts and take a more logical approach to situation assessment.

Researchers – Science and academia have been enthusiastic early adopters of VR. But much of the feedback they’re accumulating has to come from post VR experience self reporting. Now they can see what their subjects are focusing on, without having to obtrusively being in the same room as the subject, and with actual visual proof that can be saved for later review.

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2. 3D Heatmap View

What is it?

The traditional heatmap view has been in 2D. With Heatmap 2.0, the heatmap data can be viewed in 3D, mirroring the actual 360 VR media being produced.

Why is this imporant? 

For advanced users creating 3D 360 environments, a 2D heatmap isn’t nearly as valuable. Why? It doesn’t take into account the contours and depth of the scene. Reading a 2D heatmap overlaid on a 3D environment could lead to misinterpreting the user focus information. The new update gives an accurate representation of the data.

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3. Heatmap Grid View

What is it?

Previously, heatmaps have aggregated the time+ focus data into a visually appealing, but not very intuitive, display. This made extracting data somewhat difficult.

With Heatmap 2.0, we’re borrowing from the Microsoft Excel approach, using a 12 x 7 grid approach to display the visual overlay. This helps to provide a more meaningful layout to view the heatmap. It’s less “busy”. And with InstaVR Enterprise, it can be exported from visual to .csv.

Why is this imporant? 

If you can’t make meaningful decisions from the data, than heatmaps are just fun to look at. But most of our clients using it are making decisions — on viewer behavior, on how to improve the app in subsequent versions, etc. The grid layout will make decision making simpler, as it’s intuitively how are brain organizes our viewing field.

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4. Collects Data for All Major VR Platforms

What is it?

Heatmap 2.0 will collect data for all major VR platforms InstaVR publishes to, if the user is connected to WiFi or mobile data while accessing the app.

Why is this imporant? 

One of the many differentiators of InstaVR is the ability to publish across almost all of the major VR platforms. Because of this, we want to also give you the flexibility to collect user behavior data, regardless of your preferred distribution method. That’s why we’re proud to offer Heatmap 2.0 data collection across all major VR headsets.

2017-11-09T18:31:54+00:00 November 9th, 2017|General|